evocativesynthesis:

A Chandelier in Notre Dame, Paris | Photography By Laurice Marier

evocativesynthesis:

A Chandelier in Notre Dame, Paris | Photography By Laurice Marier

castlesfromallovertheworld:

Corfe Castle, England

The dramatic ruins of Corfe Castle stand on a natural hill guarding the principal route through the Purbeck Hills.

© Antony Spencer

castlesfromallovertheworld:

Corfe Castle, England

The dramatic ruins of Corfe Castle stand on a natural hill guarding the principal route through the Purbeck Hills.

© Antony Spencer

spells-of-life:

Messel family’s mansion ruins in the Nymans garden, Sussex, UK

spells-of-life:

Messel family’s mansion ruins in the Nymans garden, Sussex, UK

gothick-matt:

Bristol’s tidal range at entrance lock. Night photo from last night, day from just now…

gothick-matt:

Bristol’s tidal range at entrance lock. Night photo from last night, day from just now…

The many modes of ritual treatment and placing of the dead had their counter- parts in the mental wt)rld. where there was a wide variety of ideas about the abodes of the dead (Simek 1993). These realms were not good or evil in the same way as the heaven and hell of Christianity. The crucial thing for the abode of the dead was not the dead person’s life evaluated as a whole but rather the manner of the death. Warriors who fell in battle were believed to end up with Odin in Valhalla or with Freyja at Folkvang. Those who drowned lived with the sea goddess Ran. while many who died of disease went to Hel. the name of the goddess of death and of her abode of the dead in the underworld. There are also vague hints of other realms of the dead, known as Glcvsisve/lir (“the shining fields’). Oduinsakr (‘the fields of the undead”), and Ymisland (the land of Ymir the primeval giant). Some dead people were believed to go on living in sacred mountains or in the actual grave, while others haunted the living as ghosts. Some were moreover believed to be reborn as new people. The mythological diversity was thus at least as great as the differences in burial rites.
Behind “Heathendom”: Archaeological Studies of Old Norse Religion
ANDERS ANDRÉN
Scottish Archaeological Journal
Vol. 27, No. 2 (2005), pp. 105-138
Published by: Edinburgh University Press (via charlottesarahscrivener)

The Blacksmith’s Shop, 1771, Joseph Wright of Derby

The Blacksmith’s Shop, 1771, Joseph Wright of Derby

the-weird-wide-web:

THIS IS AN ANCIENT MEME
It’s called a “Sator Square” and it’s first known appearance comes from the ruins of Pompeii. It is a palindrome and can be read vertically and horizontally.
It was believed demons and the devil could not tamper with this inscription because they would become confused by the letters and hence was used as a good luck charm. (x)

the-weird-wide-web:

THIS IS AN ANCIENT MEME

It’s called a “Sator Square” and it’s first known appearance comes from the ruins of Pompeii. It is a palindrome and can be read vertically and horizontally.

It was believed demons and the devil could not tamper with this inscription because they would become confused by the letters and hence was used as a good luck charm. (x)

rheintochter:

madamecuratrix:

the-impaler:

Someone hold me

Best thing I’ve seen all day. Love.

OMG awesome, I’ve never seen this before

polyglotinprogress:

okay so I picked up this book and my first thought was 
why would I Polish my German that would be counter-productive I want to German my German 

polyglotinprogress:

okay so I picked up this book and my first thought was 

why would I Polish my German that would be counter-productive I want to German my German